Ash Wednesday

Today we start a new journey; a new Lent, journeying towards the great climax of the Easter Tridiuum. Although many of us have journeyed through Lent many times before, each year presents new opportunities and new challenges. Things have changed over the last 12 months; we have changed. New people have come into our lives and some have left us; new opportunities have materialised and some have disappeared. Perhaps the status of our health has changed; some have improved and some are struggling. Perhaps our relationship with God has changed; for some of us it’s improved and for some we’re struggling.

This Lent is not a repeat of previous Lents; it’s a brand new journey.

At its heart Lent is a journey to wholeness; wholeness of self and wholeness as a beloved child of God. But that journey begins with an acceptance of our brokenness – we must first confront the brokenness in our own lives and in the world around us. We confront the barriers that keep us from loving God and the barriers that keep us from loving each other.

This is not a onetime act. We don’t overcome these barriers in a day or even in 40 days but each year as we go through this Lenten process we hope to find ourselves closer at the end of it than we were when we started…closer to the goal of wholeness; a wholeness in our relationship with God and with each other.

The ashes traced on our foreheads today are a reminded of our brokenness and our human mortality and a sign of humility. A reminder that we are striving for sainthood through our imperfection.

If we journey faithfully and try diligently over the next 6 weeks to draw closer to God, the celebration of the Easter Tridiuum will be a new experience; renewed joy and wonder at the miracle of our salvation.

The Easter Tridiuum, the three days starting with the Mass of the Last Supper on Holy Thursday and concluding with the celebration of the Resurrection on Easter Sunday are the holiest and most sacred days in the year. The Passion, Death and Resurrection of our Lord celebrated in the Tridiuum are not separate and isolate events; it’s one event that takes place over three days and we are called and expected to participate fully over all three days not just Easter Sunday.

Lent has been part of the Church’s liturgical calendar for close on 1700 years and traditionally the emphasis has always been on fasting, almsgiving and prayer. Through these disciplines we consciously acknowledge our failings and weaknesses, our struggles and temptations and deliberately focus on being more loving, generous and tolerant through spiritual and corporal works of mercy.

There are many ways to practice these disciplines during Lent and it is important for each of us to search our hearts and figure out what works best to connect us more closely with Jesus in his Passion and Resurrection and with each other in our shared mission to know, love and serve God.

These sacrifices in themselves are not the focus; they are there to serve as prompts and constant reminds to us that we are in a time of penitential reflection, preparation and renewal.

Here are a few ideas we could consider and practice over the next 6 weeks:

  • Carry  a pocket size cross , or pocket rosary or a religious medal with you throughout lent as a reminder of the season
  • Participate in the various liturgies at St Michael’s during Lent:
    • Stations of the Cross on a Friday
    • Adoration for 30 minutes with Benediction on the first Tuesday
    • Spend some time in the Adoration Chapel that’s open throughout the day ever day
    • Mass during the week; we’re privileged to have Mass every day in our parish
    • The Ecclesia program on Thursday evenings
  • Keep a daily journal as a means for self-examination and prayer
  • Abstain from something:
    • perhaps a favorite food, or smoking or alcohol or a favourite TV series
    • Give up sugar and all things sweet
    • No eating or snacking after dinner or between meals
    • Remember that every Friday is a day of abstinence from meat
    • Consider some form of fasting every day; perhaps miss one meal or eat smaller portions at every meal
  • No gossiping. If someone says something negative about another person, either say something nice or say nothing. Make a note in your journal every time you slip up. We could memorize and repeat every day verse 29 from chapter 4 of the Letter to the Ephesians: :  “Do not use harmful words but only helpful words; only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who hear you.”
  • Read completely one of the Gospels (perhaps read Luke together with Luke’s Acts of the Apostles)
  • Pray every day for the poor, the brokenhearted, the hungry, the sick and the dying
  • If you are busy and can’t find time – make time by saying no to some activities and commitments and say yes to spending time with God
  • Clean out the house and the cupboards and donate things you don’t need to those who do need; or perhaps find one thing every day for 40 days to give away
  • Donate generously to the Archbishops Lenten appeal and in this way materially assist the poor and needy
  • Don’t buy anything during Lent that you don’t need and put the money that you save into the Lenten Appeal.
  • Pay your spouse or loved one, your parents and children a compliment every day
  • Replace 30 minutes of TV time with some devotional reading and prayer
    • We could use the book of daily Devotions prepared by the Youth of our Archdiocese including some written by the youth of St Michael’s
  • Replace some of your favourite music with Christian and sacred music and song
  • Keep your activity of all social media platforms to a bare minimum …. And if you really must post something let it always be kind and charitable; less about ourselves and more concern for others

Lent is really about going through a process that should change us, that should bring us closer to being fully the people God has called and created us to be.

Lent is not a means and end in itself… today is the beginning of a journey to Easter; the journey of the rest of our lives; our journey home to God.

Love Our Enemies

7th SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME
CYCLE A
19th FEBRUARY 2017
Matthew 5: 38-48
Deacon Tony van Vuuren

We are naturally inclined to resent those who do us wrong. But hatred, if we nurture it, can come between us and our loving God, who wants us to be loving, kind and forgiving.

In today’s Gospel passage taken from the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus condemns even the mild form of the “Law of the Talion, (Lex Talionis),” the Babylonian tribal law which prescribes a retaliation in kind. In other words it sets limits on punishment; the punishment not to exceed the crime.

In its place, Jesus gives his new law of love, grace, forgiveness, reconciliation and no retaliation. For Jesus; retaliation, or even limited vengeance, has no place in the Christian life, even though graceful acceptance of an offense requires great strength, discipline of character as well as strengthening by God’s grace.

The second part of today’s Gospel passage is perhaps the central and the most famous section of the Sermon on the Mount. It gives us the Christian ethic of personal relationships: love one’s neighbors and forgive one’s enemies. Above all, it tells us that what makes Christians different is the grace with which they treat others with loving kindness and mercy, even if they don’t deserve it.

The Old Law never actually said to hate enemies, but that was the way some Jews understood it. Jesus commands that we are to love our enemies and pray for those who persecute us to demonstrate that we are children of a merciful heavenly Father.
We are commanded to love our enemies as Jesus loves us.

The Greek word used for loving enemies is agápe, which is the invincible benevolence or good will for another’s highest good. Since agápe is not natural, practicing it is possible only with God’s help. Agápe love is a choice, an act of will, more than a feeling.

We choose to love, not because our enemies deserve our love, but because Jesus loves them so much that he died for them as He did for us. When Jesus talks about “the enemy” he is not necessarily referring to an enemy as in war. He is talking about someone who is possibly close to me —to you; someone in our family; in our community, our neighbourhood, in our workplace; someone who is making life difficult for us.

Who are the people we try to avoid at all costs, whom we find hard to forgive, who awaken in us feelings of unease, fear and anger, which can easily turn into hatred? Hatred is a very dangerous thing. It burns up a hundred times more energy than love. It can drive out everything else and will corrode and warp our mind and soul; creating a legacy of bitterness, hostility and resentment.

Christ’s way is a better way. To be able to forgive and turn the other cheek is not a soft way. It’s a hard way that calls for great strength and toughness and sacrifice. A perfect example of this of course is our witness to Christ during his trial and crucifixion “Love your enemies!” –this is one of the most revolutionary things ever said. Love our enemies? Most of us find it hard enough to love our friends and family all of the time.

How can we be expected to love our enemies? To love’ in the Gospel context means to ‘wish the well being of’. It is a unilateral, unconditional desire for the deepest wellbeing of another person. It does not ask any of us ‘to be in love with’, to have warm fuzzy feelings for someone who is doing us serious harm. But we can sincerely wish the well being of those who harm or persecute us.

We pray that they may change, not just for our sake but also for their own. We pray that from hating, hurting people they become loving and caring people. Further, Jesus tells us that the basic reason for doing this is to manifest God’s love towards us. He points to the fact that the action of God is unconquerable benevolence.

He is the one who makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and when the rain finally arrives here it will fall on the good and on the bad.
The Gospel passage concludes with Jesus saying, “Be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.” On the face of it that sounds like a commandment which cannot possibly have anything to do with us. Surely no one of us can even faintly connect ourselves with perfection.

(Except maybe when we fill in our CV’s) But seriously though this obviously is an ideal, a goal to be aimed at. The perfection intended is not total perfection for us, but rather to pray for ourselves for that total impartiality of a God who extends his providential care and love equally to all; good and bad, and he does not love the bad less than the good people. So, if we want to identify with Him, we have no right whatever to withdraw our love, that is, our desire for wholeness, from a single person.

Whether a person returns our love or God’s love is not important. If we reflect on it, we will begin to see that this is the only reasonable way for us to deal with people both for our own personal growth and fulfillment and as contributing also to that of others. Jesus is not asking us to do something impossible and unreasonable.

He tells us to open our eyes and see the reality and discover the most sensible way of relating ourselves with the people around us. Our faith assures us that in our relationship with God we will be able to do as he did and now instructs us: to be generous to those in need; not retaliate when offended; pray for our persecutors and even, with God’s grace, love our enemies.

St Joseph

Our Lady of the Flight into Egypt 2017
Deacon Les Ruhrmund

One of the things that struck me when I looked at the First reading and the Gospel was that a central figure in the events recalled in both readings was a man with the name Joseph; and interestingly that both of their fathers shared the name Jacob.

I thought I’d explore the role of the two Josephs in our faith.
Joseph is not actually mentioned in the first reading which tells us about the arrival of his father Jacob in Egypt with the whole family and all their belongings, escaping from a devastating famine in Canaan. But it is Joseph who had instigated and made possible their migration.

You’ll remember that Joseph had been sold into slavery in Egypt as a teenager by his jealous brothers and that they had deceived their father Jacob telling him that his favourite son Joseph had been killed by wild animals producing his multi-coloured coat stained with blood as evidence. In the ensuing years Joseph had risen to a very powerful position of authority in Egypt and was able to offer and provide a new home, food and shelter for his elderly father, brothers and their families who were on the brink of starvation in the Promised Land.

They prospered and multiplied abundantly in Egypt over the next 400 odd years until their number was so great that Pharaoh feared that they might side with his enemies in time of war and so he enslaved them to build cities and roads. And that of courses sets the scene for Moses, the Passover and significantly the return of the Jewish people from Egypt to the Promised Land.

In the Gospel reading, Joseph is the central figure. Three times while sleeping he hears the voice of God through an angel and each time he reacts swiftly, decisively and faithfully.

A few weeks ago I did a short course at the UCT Summer School on two great Renaissance painters: Leonardo Da Vinci and Piero Della Francesca. The Church at that time was a major patron of the arts and many works of Renaissance art depicted religious images painted as altarpieces or as devotional objects. In many of the paintings featuring the Holy Family (the Nativity, Presentation at the Temple, Arrival of the Magi and the Flight into Egypt), Joseph is depicted as a comparatively marginal figure alongside Mary and Jesus if not entirely in the background; sometimes looking half asleep or bored or disinterested or disengaged. And we might assume I suppose that that is how his role in God’s plan for our redemption was viewed at that time; very much a secondary role.
But that has changed.

Today St Joseph is highly revered and his essential role as Mary’s husband and protector and Jesus’ human father, guardian and teacher are universally recognised. In 1870 Pope Pius IX proclaimed Saint Joseph as the patron of the Universal Church.

Saint Joseph is also the patron saint of families, fathers, expectant mothers, immigrants and working people in general. The 1st of May, internationally celebrated as Labour Day is celebrated in the Church as the Feast of St Joseph the Worker.
And Joseph is the patron saint of the dying. We believe that Joseph died with Mary and Jesus close to him and that’s the way we all should like to leave this life.

Matthew’s account of the Flight into Egypt reaffirms a lot that we already know about Joseph from earlier references in Scripture. We know that though he came from a royal lineage, a direct descendent of King David, he was poor. When he presented the infant Jesus in the Temple 40 days after his birth, Joseph was only able to offer the sacrifice of two turtledoves or pigeons; allowed only for those who could not afford to buy a lamb.

We know that he was a compassionate, pious and righteous man. In extreme faith he took Mary as his wife even though she was pregnant with a child that was not his. The social ramifications of that decision would have been humiliating but he believed what the angel had told him about Mary’s pregnancy and acted accordingly. Perhaps even saving Mary’s life.
It takes a strong man or woman to put the will of God before the will of society. There’s a lesson there for each one of us.
Joseph had a remarkable relationship with God and Mary trusted him completely and I think it would be fair to assume the same of Jesus when he was growing up as a boy and then as a young adult with Joseph as his adoring father.

When Joseph woke from the dream telling him to get up and leave immediately and flee to Egypt he must have been very anxious and fearful. The journey would be roughly the equivalent of walking from Cape Town to Jeffrey’s Bay. And that section along the way that we know as the Garden Route would have been harsh desert. Not a journey for the faint hearted. Not a desirable journey for a Mother with an infant. An extremely challenging journey probably taking them 30 days or more. They had little money and only heaven knows how they managed.
Mary put her trust in Joseph and committed her safety and that of her baby boy into Joseph’s hands as they fled to Egypt and then some years later journeyed back to Israel.

God revealed his will to Joseph while he was at rest; while he slept.

Pope Francis has a great love for St Joseph and on his desk in his study he has a large image of Saint Joseph ….sleeping. As it happens, the inaugural Mass for the Pontificate of Pope Francis took place on March 19, Saint Joseph’s Day and one of the first things Pope Francis did after his inauguration was include Joseph, Mary’s spouse, in the Eucharistic Prayer of the Mass..

Speaking about St Joseph a couple of years ago while on a visit to the Philippines Pope Francis said: “Even when he is asleep, he is taking care of the Church! Joseph’s rest revealed God’s will to him. In our moment of rest in the Lord, as we pause from our many daily obligations and activities, God is also speaking to us. But like Saint Joseph, once we have heard God’s voice, we must rise from our slumber; we must get up and act.”
Our Lady of the Flight into Egypt, pray for us.

People of Inner Unrest

Epiphany of the Lord
Cycle A
8th January 2017
Matthew 2. 1-12
Rev Tony van Vuuren

Those of us of a certain age will remember the TV detective Columbo, the guy wearing the shabby raincoat, who was the master of the parting question. He would finish questioning someone and, as he was going out of the door and their guard was down, he would turn back with a ‘Oh, just one other thing.’ and ask that crucial question.

The Magi are like that final question. Christmas has been well and truly celebrated, the Boney M CD has been packed away together with the decorations, and the New Year is here, life is getting back to its normal routine; but then at the last minute Christmas turns back and throws us one last question, throws us the story of the Magi. The Magi are like that final question.

It seems to us like the Magi just appear at the end of the Christmas story, but for these foreign travellers the journey has been a long one. We don’t really know exactly where they come from, probably Persia, in which case they have travelled a great distance to get to Bethlehem.

We are misled by the fact that they appear, stay briefly, then depart, into thinking that this journey of theirs is a brief one, but nothing could be further from the truth. This is a long journey of extortionate cost, fraught with danger. Whatever possessed them to set out on such a mission, just to spend a few moments in Bethlehem?

This question brings us to the heart of the Epiphany Feast. If we can understand why the Magi travel all this way, we will be able to see what this feast is really about. We are rather misled by the romance of the three exotic gifts.

Our focus tends to be on the Gold and Frankincense and Myrrh, so that we come to think of the Magi as little more than gift bearers to transmit these beautiful gifts into the presence of Christ.

But this is not what they themselves say they are doing. Addressing Herod they ask ‘Where is he who has been born king of the Jews…we have come to worship him?’ and then when they arrive in Bethlehem they first throw themselves to the ground in homage before the Christ child; and only then do they reach into their bags and bring out the gifts. The wise men have not travelled all this way just to bring Jesus gifts; they have travelled all this way to worship him.

If we lose sight of that, we lose sight of the real spiritual significance of this feast. The giving of gifts is very potent; it is a prophetic act, because as we know, these are gifts with a spiritual significance, but this is nothing like as important as the Epiphany as a moment of worship.

The wise men have come all this way, have faced all that danger and discomfort, in order to worship the divine Son of God.

Still, though, we are left asking ‘why?’ Why would they travel so far in search of a God who is outside their culture, outside their territory, outside their experience? Pope Emeritus Benedict, in his book (Jesus of Nazareth Vol 3.
The Infancy Narratives p.95), has a beautiful expression that he uses to describe the Magi. He says that they would never have set out on such a journey unless they were people of “inner unrest”, that is “people of hope, people on the lookout for the true star of salvation” They travel all that way, they take all those risks including the great risk of entering Herod’s presence, because they are people of “inner unrest”.

They are not satisfied with their lives, they are driven to seek some deeper meaning, some sense of truths beyond their grasp, some sense that there is a world outside their control which they cannot master, but which they can begin to comprehend. Their minds, their souls, are restless and unable to settle, and this translates into the need to travel, to journey in search of something that will draw them upwards, up towards the truth. They are in a sense disturbed souls, but they feel very at home with that sense of incompleteness, of challenge, because for them it is the doorway to growth.

Contrast them, in this, with Herod. By the time the Magi arrive he is very definitely disturbed.
But whereas the Wise Men are at home with this inner unrest, and are able to feed off the spiritual energy that it brings, Herod does not cope with disturbance. It is at about this time that Herod has three of his sons murdered because he fears they may be a threat to his security, so he is clearly not a man who thrives on challenge and the unknown. The Magi arrive in serenity and ask their questions, throwing Jerusalem into turmoil.

Herod doesn’t just ask about where the Christ is to be born, his enquiries are frantic with evil intent. So he stands as a contrast to the Magi. They are men of inner unrest, certain that there is much they do not know, nor understand, and are anxious to open themselves to a new and deeper vision of reality; Herod already has his own vision of the World, with him firmly at the centre, and he will do anything he can to protect that set up, to make sure it is preserved at all costs.

Now, at last, we are able to understand what the final ‘Columbo question’ is that the Magi ask of us. It is perfectly timed, coming as it does just as we close off the Christmas season but also at the start of the New Year and Ordinary time.

As Christ is presented to us once again through the Gospels in the coming year, will we react like Herod, or like the Magi? Will we insist on bending and twisting and warping Christ so that he fits in with our way of doing things, with what I want to do, with what I want to be, will we try and force him to fit into our plans for the future?

Or will we allow him to challenge us and to change us; will we allow his words and his actions to disturb and unsettle us, even to make us change course, to turn life around, to do things differently? Will we allow ourselves to be led on a journey far from the place of comfort, so that we can take our place in God’s plan?

The Magi had to travel a long way on their journey, but most of us can make the journey within, because the real journey takes place in our minds, in our souls. It begins with a change of heart, with a decision to allow the Holy Spirit to help us find God’s presence.

If we can face each situation with confidence and with an open heart, fear and doubt will begin to melt away. We will find Jesus in unexpected, unlikely places; just as the Magi did.

RELATIONSHIPS

SECOND SUNDAY OF ADVENT
CYCLE A
4TH DECEMBER 2016
Matthew: 3: 1-12
Deacon Tony van Vuuren.

How many of us get a sense of peace listening to today’s Gospel? John the Baptist’s preaching is more like a dire warning on this 2nd Sunday of Advent with the theme of Peace.

The language of the ancient prophets was in large part the language of rebuke. It was harsh, condemnatory language, denouncing the community’s lack of faith, condemning any kind of hypocrisy or bogus spirituality, social injustice or economic exploitation. John the Baptist adopted this abrasive and threatening style of preaching.

He just pours out this angry, contemptuous language, doing what the prophet Isaiah said he would do, “Preparing the way of the Lord, making His paths straight.”
Whilst trying to prepare and find a thread of Peace in the Gospel message, it st

ruck me that it is not the Lord’s paths that need to be straightened out, but ours. We can take the opportunity of preparing for the coming of our Lord this Advent by straightening our paths.

So what might these words mean for us? What are the things that need to be straightened out in our lives? Of course, only we can truly answer that for ourselves. What if we just consider the relationships that we have or do not have with family and friends? Relationships that are often twisted and tangled and crooked.

Relationships that have embittered our hearts; the animosities that have set family member against family member or neighbour against neighbour; silly quarrels that are kept alive; the jealousies and misunderstandings; or just stubborn pride!

We let misunderstandings run on from year to year; meaning to clear them up someday. We keep quarrels alive because we cannot quite make up our minds to sacrifice our pride and end them. We avoid someone, not speaking to them out of some silly spite or prejudice, and yet knowing we would be filled with remorse and shame if we heard that that person were dead tomorrow.

Out of jealously we don’t give a word of appreciation or encouragement to a sibling or friend letting them think they had done something wrong by being ignored. And so one can go on quoting about a breakdown in different relationship situations that are allowed to fester and never get resolved.

If only we would realise that “time is short”, and how it would break the spell if we would go instantly and do the right thing which we might never have another chance to do.

For those of us who have had the opportunity of restoring a relationship with someone or even a whole family; we know the feeling of relief, of love, of peace.

The phrase “Peace on Earth” starts with us; with our attitudes towards others. Our words convey the attitude of our hearts and create a culture of peace or hate and anger within our homes. Sometimes it is hard to tell which attitude is being promoted as our words speak of peace but our actions promote discord. If we stop loving our neighbour as ourselves and forget to treat everyone with the same respect and love we would desire for ourselves, there can be no peace on earth.

To write “Peace on Earth” on our Christmas cards or email messages and then refuse to speak to certain family members over the holidays or teach our children not to have anything to do with children of another race stands in the way of true peacemaking. We have the opportunity during this Advent time of reflection to be the peacemakers. We are all given the opportunity to help in some small or big way to bring peace on earth. But it is more than a cute festive season phrase.

It is about the very attitudes of our hearts. Take the time to say St Francis’ prayer; “Make me an instrument of your peace.”

God doesn’t abandon us when we stray from the straight path. He keeps calling us back from our crooked ways to the straight path. Advent is an excellent time to aim ourselves in the right direction and commit ourselves to the right path.

The path of truth, honesty and peace of mind. So if there is some crooked or twisted attitude, or some crooked way of behaving, or some crooked relationship that needs to be straightened out; let’s straighten it out now. We will truly be preparing a way for the Lord to come to us.

An invitation from the King

Christ the King
Year C
20 Nov 2016
Deacon Les Ruhrmund

Today, the Church celebrates with great joy the Feast of Christ the King. It is the last Sunday of the liturgical year and, in many ways, the culmination of all the feasts of the past year – the intent of Advent and Christmas, Lent and Easter, Pentecost and Corpus Christi, and all the Sundays and feasts. They have all pointed toward this reality, that Christ is the King of the Universe, the Lord of all. All of time, all of history is heading toward this climax when Christ will be proclaimed as the universal King of Kings.

We also celebrate today the end of the Jubilee Year of Mercy and the Jubilee Doors of Mercy that were opened on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception in December last year are being closed in cathedrals and shrines throughout the world this weekend.

The introduction of the Feast of Christ the King is a relatively recent addition to the liturgical calendar. It was instituted by Pope Pius XI in 1925.

Some weeks ago I spoke about how our human experience and understanding of the role and behaviour of a ‘Father’ in our own lives and in society can often be an obstacle in our relationship with God, the Father because we project the picture that we have in our heads of a father onto the persona of God who is far beyond the scope of our experience and imagination.

The same could be said for our understanding or misunderstanding of Christ the King. We normally associate kingship with political and economic influence, majesty and pomp, wealth and elevated status, privilege and prestige; words that are quite contrary to the kingship of Christ. In the Gospel reading we are presented with the king of the universe nailed to a cross; condemned and humiliated; naked and powerless; dying. He dies that we may enjoy eternal life. He rescues us from a kingdom of darkness and opens the door to his kingdom of light.

The values that best describe the kingdom that Jesus proclaims would include humility and love, service, sacrifice, charity, mercy and forgiveness. And so it’s no surprise that the kingdom of God and our secular world are at extreme odds with each other. It was this vast gulf between the two and the ever consuming power of materialism and greed, a turning away from God, that motivated Pope Pius XI to introduce this feast seven year after the end of what is referred to as the Great War; WW1. It was a bleak time in the history of the world when the dark clouds of dictatorship and communism cast their shadows over a world desperate forpeace.

Pope Pius wrote at that time  “As long as individuals and states refuse to submit to the rule of our Saviour, there can be no really hopeful prospect of a lasting peace among nations” Those words are as frighteningly true and prophetic today and they were in 1925.

We celebrate today a king who reigns from the cross. The rulers of the people at that time and the roman soldiers insult him with the title ‘King of the Jews.” It’s a picture of a man whose life has ended in disgrace. The only one who does recognise Jesus’ kingship is the so called ‘good thief.’ Hanging next to Jesus, this man knows himself and he accepts that his crime has brought him to crucifixion. He knows that Jesus is innocent and makes a profound cry for mercy which becomes an act of faith “Jesus remember me when you come into your kingdom.”

From this gospel portrait we can take away a simple truth about Christ our King. The world will not always recognise him. His kind of kingship is revealed in the midst of suffering and death and those that do recognise him do so when they understand that truth.

As we prepare to start a new year in the life of the Church, we each today could think about our personal history; our mistakes, our sins, our fears and joys, our successes and failures in our relationships with God and with each other. We know that we are truly not worth of the love of Christ and his sacrifice on the cross; not one of us has cleans hands and a pure heart. But we also know with absolute certainty that we’ll find forgiveness and redemption through God’s infinite mercy if we seek it with a contrite heart. The repentant thief, crucified at Jesus’ side, accompanied him into paradise.

We should not allow ourselves to be held captive by the past!

Even if we wanted to, we can never rewrite the past. But the history that starts today, and looks to the future, has yet to be written. It will be written by the grace of God and by the choices we make from this day on. By learning from past mistakes, we can open a new chapter of your lives. Let us never yield to the temptation of thinking that we cannot be forgiven. Whatever our weaknesses and failings, great or small, whatever accusations we level at ourselves in our hearts, God’s love and grace is greater and knows no limit.

We need but entrust ourselves to his mercy; to allow him to rule over our hearts as our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe.So long as our hearts continue to beat, the invitation of Christ to join him in paradise, still stands.

——–

Deacon Les 19 November 2016

Gift of Salvation

31st SUNDAY ORDINARY TIME
CYCLE C
30th OCTOBER 2016.
Luke 19: 1-10
Tony van Vuuren

The whole picture of God that emerges through today’s readings is a picture of someone who understands the frailty of human nature, someone who never loses sight of our potential for holiness in spite of various kinds of sinfulness. And this is the image of God that Jesus projected, very deliberately and purposefully, in his own ministry –as a Father who sent his Son, “to seek out and save the lost”; as we see in the encounter between Jesus and Zacchaeus.

Zacchaeus was a wealthy man and a senior tax-collector. That means that he was somebody who had been prepared to sacrifice his religious principles and his membership of the Jewish community to work for the Romans and increase his own wealth.

But in spite of these apostasies, which mean having rebelled against God, it turns out that Zacchaeus wasn’t someone who was completely closed to God. Luke doesn’t give us any great psychological explanation as to why Zacchaeus was curious about Jesus. He doesn’t tell us whether Christ noticed something special about Zacchaeus’ attitude that suggested a sort of openness to his message. There must have been more to Zacchaeus’ meeting with Christ, which had such a huge impact on him, than we’re told in these few lines.

The important thing though is that after receiving Christ as a guest in his house, Zacchaeus turned his life around. He gives away half of his property to the poor and pays back the people he’s cheated four times the amount he took from them in the first place. Jesus describes these concrete actions as the coming of salvation in Zacchaeus’ life.

There are two aspects to this salvation that comes to Zacchaeus. One aspect is what we might call restoration. The relationship between God and Zacchaeus, which had been lost, is now restored. The relationship between Zacchaeus and the rest of the community of believers is restored. That comes about because Zacchaeus repairs his relationship with the people he’s cheated in the past: he wipes out the wrong he’s done by paying them back four times as much as he took from them in the first place.
The story of Zacchaeus’ restoration reminds me of a statement made by an Italian survivor of the Nazi concentration camps when talking about the Nazis who expressed sorrow afterwards for what they had done, He said that for him “verbal repentance is not enough”; genuine repentance means “a person has to show by their actions that they are no longer the person they were”.

This was what Zacchaeus did. His turn around; his change of heart, his conversion, could hardly have been more spontaneous, more sincere, more complete. He showed by his actions that he was no longer the man he’d been. And when harmony is restored between people in that way, Jesus called it ‘salvation’.

The second aspect of the salvation that’s at work in this incident is what we might call liberation. In the Bible, and in our Christian theology, the idea of salvation always carried with it the meaning of being delivered, or freed, from slavery – and Zacchaeus is freed in a very obvious way from the slavery of accumulating money, which up till this point had been the main goal of his life.

Earlier on in his gospel Luke has already given us an example of somebody who wasn’t able to take this step – the rich young man, who wasn’t necessarily a sinner, but ‘went away sad’ rather than parting with any of his wealth. He didn’t experience his meeting with Christ or hear the gospel message, as liberation. He experienced it as a sacrifice which he wasn’t prepared to make.

Zacchaeus is a counterbalance to the young man. Jesus’ visit to his house left him more than willing to give up the lesser good of his wealth for the greater good of being reconciled with God. And on this one occasion at least, Christ’s preference for the company of people who were outside the boundaries of the religious Law was vindicated.

There is so much enlightenment and comfort for us in this story of Jesus, “going in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.” We see Jesus for what he was and still is, ‘the friend of sinners’, and therefore our friend. Our understanding, compassionate, and forgiving friend! Our friend who is there when others fail or desert us! The one who helps and heals when others only criticize and condemn! The one who never gives up on us, never despairs of us! The one who waits patiently for us to change our lives, and who allows us time to do so!

The one, in short, who loves us with an everlasting love, an everlasting forgiving love, an everlasting healing love, and an everlasting transforming love!

Just like Zacchaeus, then, let us welcome Jesus, into our lives and into our home, knowing and trusting what a difference he will make, as he brings to us his precious gift of salvation! Life for us will undoubtedly still have its challenges and temptations, but what an easier journey it will be for us if we answer His knock on the door. There is no handle on His side.

There is something we must always remember about God. On the one hand, He takes us as we are; He overlooks our faults and sins in His desire to restore our friendship with Him. But on the other hand He never leaves us as we are, and it’s only when a fundamental turning-around has taken place in our lives that Jesus will announce the arrival of salvation.